search

Report: Trump Will Use CPAC Speech to Begin 2024 Run

Former President Donald Trump is getting ready to make headlines with his first speech since leaving office last month.

Trump is planning to brand himself as the “presumptive 2024 nominee” during his speech at CPAC, Axios reported Monday.

While it is well known that Trump remains a dominant force in the Republican Party, this would be the first public indication from him that he wants to run for a second non-consecutive term.

TRENDING: Biden Forces Out Prosecutor Investigating Powerful Democrats

Recent polling without Trump in the race typically have former Vice President Mike Pence leading, but many Republicans back Trump in polling with him included.

Trump has an extremely loyal base that would make it difficult for any primary candidate to truly gain any ground, which should concern Republicans looking to carve a new direction for the party and the conservative movement.

Objectively speaking, the biggest issue that the Republicans would encounter in the scenario Trump becomes the 2024 nominee is actually winning the general election.

The Biden-Harris ticket already beat Trump once, who is to say they cannot do it again?

Especially after the Jan. 6 incursion, which resulted in many Republicans deregistering, there is a lot of ground that would need to be gained back.

RELATED: ‘Borat’ Sequel Exposes Hollywood Left Letting Comedy Die for the Sake of Anti-Trump Propaganda

At the end of the day, this should be less about Trump and more about the ideas he represented.

Trump’s policies on the economy and foreign policy were fairly popular, and someone like Republican Florida Governor Ron DeSantis would be a representation of those views while also being more electable.

The former president’s leverage to endorse or rebuke candidates during the primaries would probably better result in a Republican victory than a 2024 run — but the cult of personality will not let him go.

While some may argue that what Trump stood and fought for as president needs to continue, Republicans need to be asking themselves if the 74-year-old should pass down the torch or stay as the party’s figurehead.

The populist right is here to stay, but Trump clearly wants to stick around with it.

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Related Post

This website uses cookies.